Posts by Andre

    Dear Hedy,

    Thank you for your hint! I also think that the two slits of the Saalfeld letter from 1746 (page 13/128) were done to seal the letter and not for disinfection. Please find attached a letter from my collection which show the strip of paper which will break if the letter is opened. What do you think?

    Kind regards,

    André



    Letter from July 23th, 1828, with "prix courant" from Bahia (Brazil) to Barcelona. The letter was forwarded by "Supino y Segre de Gibraltar" and posted in San Roque. The receiver in Barcelona had to pay a postage of 12 cuartos de vellon for a single letter from Andalusia to Catalonia (tariff of 1815 ).


    The letter was probably disinfected in Gibraltar and has two fumigation slits (circa 27 mm).

    Dear Hedy,

    Disinfected letters with such interesting text content are hard to find. They show us how difficult and dangerous it was to travel in former centuries . Thank you for showing this item!

    Yours sincerely,

    André

    Letter written Nov. 13th, 1833 in Gibraltar and sent overland to Genoa. During 1833/34 the Cholera was ragging on the Iberian Peninsula. The letter has a 18 mm fumigation slit. Denis Vandervelde and Richard Garcia report in their booklet "Gibraltar – Quarantine and Disinfection of Mail" from letters with a similar slit which were sent from Gibraltar to Schiedam. They speculated that these letters were disinfected in St.-Jean-de-Luz. I have seen a letter with this slit sent from Gibraltar to Cadiz in 1833. This lead me to the assumption that the treatment probably already was done in San Roque.


    – "S.ROQUE / FRANCA" = The letter was sent via San Roque and was prepaid until Irun (the exchange Post office to France). The franco of 15 cuartos was noted on the backside of the cover (tariff of 1815: letter up to 5 adarmes from Base Andalusia to Irun).


    – "DE GIBR. / S.ROQUE / ANDA. BAXA" = letter from Gibraltar via San Roque (Base Andalusia)


    – "ESPAGNE PAR / ST. JEAN-DE-LUZ" = the letter entered France in St.-Jean-de-Luz


    – "T F" cachet = transit via France


    – "14 XBRE" = the letter received Genoa on Dec. 14th, 1833


    – The recipient in Genoa had to pay 27 Soldi = 18 Soldi foreign postage (French-Sardinian postal treaty of 1822) + 9 Soldi Sardinian inland postage Nizza-Genoa (Tariff of 1818: 75 to 100 miles = 9 Soldi). The Sardinian post had to pay 36 décimes pro 30g transit letters to the French post.


    French-Sardinian postal treaty of 1822: http://www.dasv-postgeschichte…ownload.asp?file=1171.pdf


    1 Sardinian mile = 2.470 meter

    2 Soldi = 1 décimes



    Gibraltar_Genua_VS_Schnitt.jpg

    Letter from Marseille (June 20th, 1855) via Perpignan (June 22nd, 1855) to Palma (June 24, 1855) with two 16 mm slits.


    The former collection of D. Antonio Soler Padro had two further letters from this epidemic. The first was sent on August 9th 1854 from Barcelona to Ciutadella (Menorca). The second letter was sent August 31st, 1855 from Barcelona to Palma. Both letters have two slits which looks similar to mine from Marseille to Palma. This leads to the assumption that the disinfection took place in Barcelona.

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    The disease entered Spain through the Atlantic port city of Vigo in early 1853 and spread rapidly through the surrounding area, became extinguished in the winter of 1854 and appeared in Vigo once again in early May. (source: Encyclopedia of Plague and pestilence, G.C. Kohn)


    Letter from Vigo (March 1st, 1854) to Bilbao (March 7th, 1854) with one 12 mm chisel slit

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    Dear Hedy,

    A very interesting inland letter from the cholera epidemic of 1853/56! In 1855 the cholera reached Portugal through the Douro river in May and it spread from there. The harbour of Oporto was declared dirty on July 1st, 1855. By November/December the epidemic came to an end. I have two Spanish disinfected letters from this epidemic in my collection (Spanish Cholera Epidemic of 1854/55) but none of them is related to Portugal.

    André


    P.S. I have almost all Pratique volumes but vol. XXIX no2 is still missing. Is it possible that you make scans or photographs of the article you were referring to?

    I have added two letters from the collection of Denis. He also mentioned that the cachets are different and recommend to examine the relation of the E in PREUSS with the S in STEMP.

    - 23.07.1831: Nowemiasto (Nowe Miasto nad Pilica) to Berlin – E is well to the left of S in STEMP

    - 01.09.1831: Namslau to Ratibor – E is slightly to the right of S in STEMP

    - 04.09.1831: Posen via Zuckmantel to Vienna – E is directly above the S of STEMP

    Namslau_detail.png


    Posen_detail.png


    The updated list:

    - 03.07.1831: Jungbunzlau to Langensalza

    - 23.07.1831: Nowemiasto (Nowe Miasto nad Pilica) to Berlin

    - 01.08.1831: Warsaw via Berlin and Forbach to Paris

    - 26.08.1831: Lauenburg to Stargard
    - 01.09.1831: Namslau to Ratibor

    - 04.09.1831: Posen via Zuckmantel to Vienna

    - 21.09.1831: Krotoschin to Kelbra

    - 28.09.1831: Ratibor to Kosel

    - 14.10.1831: Lauenburg to Stargard

    Denis told me: " ... mail was NEVER slit or treated on leaving this country" (this country = Great Britain)

    "Remember that almost all countries were quite unconcerned at the danger from outgoing mail. The only significant exceptions were Russia and the Ottomans, both of whom were periodically worried that their ships might not get access to European ports."


    This means that the three slits – even if they are done in the same manner as in Standgate Creek – have been applied on arrival in the Netherlands.

    The three chisel slits applied to the letter from 1832 from Devizes (England) to Bonn (Prussia) are in the same manner as they were applied in Standgate Creek. I have sent Denis an e-mail and asked for his opinion.

    Dear Bjoern,

    Thank you for the additions!

    André


    - 03.07.1831: Jungbunzlau to Langensalza

    - 01.08.1831: Warsaw via Berlin and Forbach to Paris

    - 26.08.1831: Lauenburg to Stargard

    - 01.09.1831: Namslau to Ratibor

    - 21.09.1831: Krotoschin to Kelbra

    - 28.09.1831: Ratibor to Kosel

    - 14.10.1831: Lauenburg to Stargard

    Dear Hedy,


    The letter had a written notice "per Steam Boat" which was crossed out. There are also no postal marks or notices about charges for the way from Lucerne to Rotterdam. There is also no indication that the letter was send to the forwarder by regular mail. I have two explanations how the letter received the forwarder in Rotterdam:

    1) the letter was carried privately

    2) the letter was sent (together with other letters) enclosed in a larger cover/letter to reduce the shipping costs

    We can only guess ...


    The lack of the "GEZUIVERD" or "Marine / Gezuiverd" cachet can be explained with the hectic in these frontier post offices / quarantine stations.


    Kind regards,

    André

    Dimension: 48x11 mm / 48x12 mm

    Color: black

    Form: single framed framed cachet


    Meyer: page 164/165

    Feuser: No. 55

    Grobe: No. 9 (44?x11 mm)

    Ravasini: No. 17, page 332 (38?x11 mm)


    Please find attached a map with the route of three letters with the "KOEN:PREUSS: / SANITAET:STEMP" cachet:

    - Jungbunzlau to Langensalza (July 3rd, 1831)

    - Lauenburg to Stargard (Aug. 26th, 1831)

    - Ratibor to Kosel (Sept. 28th, 1831)



    1) I have one letter with this cachet (48x11 mm) in my collection. It was sent from Jungbunzlau (Austria) to Langensazla (Prussia). This letter is hard to explain. It has two manuscript marks "retour von Rumburg / zu Berlin" (return from Rumburg to Berlin), "von B Friedland / 6" (from Böhmisch Friedland / 6 SGr.) and a blackening. Rumburg was the exchange post office to Saxony and Böhmisch Friedland the exchange post office to Prussia. Langensalza is situated in the Province of Saxony (Prussia). My assumption is that sender has probably wrongly noted Saxony instead of Province of Saxony (Prussia) and the letter was delivered to Rumburg. There they noticed the mistake, blackened the note and directed the letter to Berlin. The postage of 6 SGr. equals sending a letter from Böhmisch Friedland to Berlin (30-40 miles). It is not known why the letter was sent to Berlin instead directly to Langensalza but there is a notice of the addressee on the backside that he has received and answered the letter.


    2) The letter sent from Lauenburg to Stargard (48x12 mm) belongs to the collection of Hedy.


    3) There is a third letter with this cachet known which was sent from Ratibor to Cosel. This letter was offered by the Auktionshaus Heinrich Köhler (357. Auktion).



    Please add further letters known with this cachet.

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    Dear Hedy,

    Thank you for showing this interesting item. Your letter was posted by the forwarder in Rotterdam. Unfortunately we don't know where the letter entered the Netherlands. The V-shaped slits are only the result of opening the letter. If you have a look at the article "GEZUIVERD" cachet of 1831/32 than you will notice that the three chisel slits applied to your letter looks the same as the letter disinfected at Brielle. I do not know for certain if other disinfection station in the Netherlands applied the same kind of slits.

    Kind regards,

    André


    Hedy_1832_NL.jpg

    As an attraction of the Philatelic Meeting in Graz in 1968 letters and cards were perforated with historic equipment of the St. Bartholomew Hospital in Muggia (near Triest). This historic equipment was also used to celebrate the centenary of the Lazaretto in 1967.


    On ebay I found an interesting offer of these souvenirs. The ebay seller allowed me to use his pictures for our website. Thank you very much!


    1967.jpg1968.jpg1968_2.jpg

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    Dear Hedy,

    Congratulation to your Gold medal :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup: and your feedback from the exhibition! My experience is that there are only a few collectors worldwide specialized in disinfected mail but there are a lot of collectors interested in this subject because they have some some letters added to there country or topic collection.

    Kind regards,

    André


    P.S. Denis told me that he is considering to enter the FIP International in Jerusalem in May.